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August 27th, 2014

androidphone_Aug26_AWhen you first get your hands on your Android smartphone, you’ll be asked about location services and whether you want to enable them. Google and your carrier will have its own location services that you’ll need to approve as well. But what you might not know is that there are actually a few other options for location services with Android which can affect your smartphone’s security. To that end, let’s take a look at how to change some of these Android settings.

Photos and GPS tagging

Your Android smartphone gives you the ability to attach GPS coordinates to the pictures you take, known as geo-locating or GPS tagging. This lets you arrange pictures in albums by locations, or lets Google+ stitch together stories of your trips. Geo-locating images in itself isn’t a bad thing, but you can get into trouble when you broadcast sensitive locations to the world. For instance, a picture of your expensive watch with a GPS tag of your house isn’t the best idea.

Four ways to control geo-locating photos:

  1. Go to your camera settings and you’ll find an on/off toggle.
  2. Simply go into Settings>Location and from there you can decide if you want the location saved along with your images.
  3. Download an EXIF editor and manually remove the location information from specific images.
  4. You can also turn off location services altogether by going to Settings>Location.

Discrete location settings

Apart from location settings in photos and GPS tagging, Android actually has three discrete location settings which allow you to set how accurately you want location reporting to be. You can find these at Settings>Location, Note that this affects your smartphone’s battery life immensely.
  • High accuracy: This uses the GPS radio in your phone to pinpoint its exact location from satellites while making use of nearby Wi-Fi and cellular networks too.
  • Battery saving: This mode only uses Wi-Fi networks and mobile networks to identify locations, and while it might not be as accurate it will help your phone last longer.
  • Device sensors only: This only uses the GPS radio to find you. It may take a little more time to find your location since it’s not using nearby Wi-Fi and mobile networks to get your general location first. This also uses more battery.
Having your location settings turned off will not only help keep your smartphone’s security intact, but also help strengthen your smartphone’s battery life. Interested in learning more about Android phones and their functions? We have solutions for you and your business.
Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

August 1st, 2014

AndroidPhone_July28_AIn many countries when you go to buy a mobile phone, and more specifically an Android phone, from a carrier the mobile carrier will often install their own apps onto the device. These apps, commonly referred to as bloatware, are usually tied into a service that your carrier offers and are for the most part ignored by most users. The problem is, the majority of users don't really want these apps but when they try uninstalling them they often quickly find that they cannot. However, there is something you can do about this issue.

Bloatware defined

Read Android themed blogs and you will eventually come across this term. When it is used to refer to mobile phones, bloatware is software that has been installed by carriers or device manufacturers. These apps are generally useless, unwanted, or are value-added apps - meaning apps which you need to pay extra for in order to use e.g., a music service run by your carrier.

The kicker with bloatware is that you don't get a choice as to whether or not it is installed on your phone. The reason for this is because carriers and manufacturers install the apps before you purchase the phone. Many carriers have contracts with manufacturers to actually install the software before the device leaves the factory.

Is bloatware bad?

Mobile bloatware often gets a bad rap, especially because much of it is unwanted by users. That doesn't mean the apps are 'bad', or malicious. In fact, some users do actually use the software that comes installed by mobile carriers. The issue many have is that they have had no say in the matter and as a result feel forced into using certain apps, when they would rather be using something else, or would never have downloaded these apps in the first place.

In short, the vast majority of bloatware is not overly useful but it is by no means malicious. It's really more of an annoyance to many users.

Can I get rid of bloatware?

The short answer to this question is: No, you usually can't get rid of bloatware. Some of it can be uninstalled, but most of the apps installed by the carrier or manufacturer aren't able to be deleted.

That being said, there are two options you can consider:

1. Disable bloatware on your device

While you usually can't uninstall bloatware, phones running Android 4.X and newer do have the option of disabling it.
  1. Open your device's Settings panel. This is usually done by sliding down from the top of the screen and selecting the person icon with five squares followed by Settings.
  2. Tap on Apps and swiping right so All is highlighted at the top.
  3. Scroll to the app you would like to disable and tap on it.
  4. Press Disable.
  5. Tap Ok in the warning that opens.
  6. Once you do this, the app will be removed from the home screen and will no longer run in the background.

2. Purchase devices without bloatware

If you are currently looking for a new device, or are looking to upgrade your current phone, an option would be to purchase a device that doesn't have bloatware. For example, most phones you purchase separately from your carrier won't have carrier specific bloatware. Take for example Nexus devices. These phones, when bought outright, only have stock Google apps like Calendar, Gmail, Chrome, and Google Play store installed. Of course, if you buy the device from your carrier, there is a good chance it will have the apps on them. So it is best to look at the big-box stores or retailers.

If you are unsure as to whether the device you are looking at has bloatware installed, try asking the salesperson or looking at online reviews. As a general rule of thumb: If you buy the device from a carrier, or on a contract, the device will have some bloatware on it - most carriers have a stipulation on the agreement you sign giving them permission to install it, or noting that it is installed. When you sign the contract you thereby agree to have the apps on your device.

The major downside to buying devices like this for some users is that you have to pay full price for the device. For some this is worth it, while others are ok with the odd bit of bloatware if they get to pay less for their device.

Looking to learn more about Android phones? Contact us today to see how we can help.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

July 4th, 2014

AndroidPhone_June30_AGoogle Docs is becoming an increasingly popular tool for many business users, especially due to the fact that the solution offers a powerful suite of productivity apps like Docs and Slides. Earlier this year, these apps went mobile, with Google releasing standalone mobile versions of Docs and Sheets. The popular presentation creation app Slides was missing however, with Google explaining that it would be released 'later'. Well, Google has delivered on their promise and released a Google Slides app for Android devices.

What exactly is the Google Slides app? I thought it was part of Google Drive...

As many who use Google Apps know, productivity apps like Slides, Docs, and Sheets are part of Google's cloud storage app - Drive. If you have used the Drive app on your phone or tablet, you likely also know that you can create, edit, and share documents via this app.

This development is an effort to extend the capabilities of Drive, while simultaneously making it easier for users to access their individual files. For example, if you are a heavy user of Slides it can be a little annoying and time consuming to open the Drive app, search for the file you want, open it, and start editing. Now, if you have the app installed you can open it for immediate access to your related files, in this case Slides.

The key here is to think of the Slides app as a branch of the Google Drive App, as all of your files are still linked to Drive. Create a presentation using the Slides app and it will show up automatically on Google Drive as well as in the app. This app has all the same features as the Drive version, it is just that the app has been specifically written for mobile devices and designed for ease of use.

What can I do with this app?

As we stated above, the main focus of the Slides app is to allow you to create and edit presentations from your Android device. As such, there are a number of useful features:
  • The ability to create and edit presentations offline. As long as you have accessed a Slides presentation while online, it will be made available for you to open and edit offline as well. You can also save individual presentations to your device's hard drive and have the file updated when the presentation is.
  • Advanced sharing features. You are able to share your presentation from a mobile device and have users on their devices or computers collaborate on the same file.
  • Automatic saving of presentations created and edited on the Web. As long as you have an Internet connection, changes made to files via the app will be synced with Google Drive and reflect on all versions of the presentation. If you are offline, the changes will sync when you are next online.
  • The ability to open, edit, and save Microsoft PowerPoint presentations directly from the app. This is a big feature, largely due to the fact that many businesses use PowerPoint instead of Slides. What this means for you is that you can view these files without PowerPoint installed on your device.
  • Full editing capabilities. You are able to create slides, add text, edit slide order and the overall format of your text and slides.
  • Present directly from your device. You can run presentations on your device or connect to a projector using adapters that can usually be purchased for your device.

Where can I find the Slides app?

This app is available now on Google Play. To install it you can:
  1. Open the Google Play app on your device.
  2. Press the magnifying glass and type in Google Slides.
  3. Tap on the app and select Install.
  4. Open the app when it has been installed.
When you open the app, you should see all of your slides related to your Google account pop up in the app.

If you are looking to learn more about Google's apps on your Android device contact us today to see how we can help ensure that you get the apps your business needs most.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

June 4th, 2014

androidphone_June2_AIt’s undeniable that the number of Android users has grown tremendously over the past few years. With more customized features and increased apps, many people are turning to the Android operating system. As with most mobile device owners, they find it essential to maximize storage space on their smartphones and tablets. The question is: "How can I boost storage space on my Android device?"

MicroSD card:

The best way to get more storage on your Android device is to buy a microSD card. A decent 64GB card can be bought for as little as USD$40 and inserted straight into your smartphone or tablet. Go to Settings and Storage and assign what you want to be saved to your microSD card in the future, as well as moving existing files to maximize storage space.

It's important to note that not all devices have microSD storage slots. The Nexus 5, for example, does not support a microSD card, so make sure your device can support expanded storage in this way first.

Cloud storage:

While a fair number of Android devices do have a microSD card slot, an alternative option for freeing up space is to use cloud storage. Those that haven’t embraced the changes the cloud have brought may find it a little tricky at first, but it soon becomes second nature. We recommend using cloud storage apps to store images, important files, and any files which are either too big or too small to make accessing them via a data connection worthwhile.

One of the best ways to access cloud storage is to download an app to your Android device. The perk here is that with most cloud storage apps, you can set these to automatically back up selected files. Make sure to check that your files are saved on the cloud app and then you can delete the files from your smartphone or tablet to create more space. The only downside to this is that you’ll need Internet or data connection to view photos on your Android device.

Delete unused apps:

If you have a new Android device and you’re already running out of space, you can free some by deleting any bloatware that might have come preinstalled on your device. Some bloatware apps can’t be deleted, but most of them can be removed. Simply go to Settings then tap Apps and then tap the app you want to delete and press the Uninstall button.

If you’ve had your Android device for some time, chances are that you have downloaded many apps including those that are rarely used now. Uninstalling these apps is a great way to free up some space. Simply open your app drawer, tap, and hold on an app to uninstall. When your home screen pops up drag the app to the top of the device and drop it over Uninstall to delete.

Wireless hard drive:

A wireless hard drive is a final option for gaining access to more storage space on your Android device. It is exactly the same as a portable hard drive, except that you connect to it via Wi-Fi.

One of the best wireless hard drives available right now is the Kingston Digital Wi-Drive 32GB which can be bought for as low as USD$50. These wireless hard drives are usually available from 32GB to 1TB, so make sure you choose one that will cover your future usage as well.

Having more storage space on your mobile device will not only enhance your work security but also give you some room to breathe. Looking to learn more about Android phones and what each one has to offer? Call us today for a chat.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

May 9th, 2014

AndroidPhone_May06_AA new security problem, known as Heartbleed, has infiltrated the Internet and caused havoc to both large companies and individual users. Despite the efforts of major companies to release updates to counter its effects, the damage has still been enormous. What you need to do is learn more about Heartbleed and how you can counter this threat on your Android device.

The whole Internet community was thrown into chaos as soon as word about Heartbleed leaked out. Major companies were quick to respond and released updates to counter Heartbleed. It is a threat that you need to be aware of.

How Heartbleed works

Heartbleed is a weakness in the OpenSSL software which allows any attacker to steal information directly from the memory space of an application. This information includes private keys which keep data securely coded as it travels in the Internet.

This problem may seem insignificant to some but it’s important to note that the kind of information that can be stolen may include login data and online financially related accounts like PayPal and other money transferring sites.

The extent of damage caused by Heartbleed

Given the popularity of OpenSSL, the extent of damage expected is high. In fact, it did not come as a surprise that this threat even reached mobile devices through installed mobile apps. This is because mobile apps have built-in encryption to allow users to log-in safely.

Smartphones and the Heartbleed threat

Apple has claimed that its iOS is safe and Heartbleed cannot cause any problem to iOS devices. The same cannot be said though for all Android devices. Google has admitted that almost all versions of Android from 4.1 up contain vulnerable versions of OpenSSL. These devices are relatively safe though since all but Android 4.1.1 had the heartbeat feature turned on by default. However, the possibility of some OEMs switching the heartbeat feature back on in their phones is not remote, making the threat still very much real for all.

Bluebox and the Bluebox Heartbleed Scanner

In response to this threat, security software company Bluebox has developed an app that can scan your phone, available on the Google Play Store. When the Android major master key vulnerability was discovered in the past it was also Bluebox that stepped in and released a similar tool to address the issue.

This latest scanner allows smartphone users to check their devices to see whether they are safe or not. The Bluebox Heartbleed Scanner looks for apps installed within a device that carry their own OpenSSL versions. In turn, it checks the versions of the library to see if heartbeat is enabled.

The user’s part in addressing the problem

It is important to remember that once the scanner has detected apps that show vulnerability, the user need to do two things. Firstly, you need to report this in the apps review section of Google Play Store. This warns other users of an app's vulnerability. Secondly, you need to send an email to the developers. This notifies them and allows them to address this problem in their next update releases.

If you have any questions regarding the security of your devices, contact us today to see how we can help.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

April 11th, 2014

AndroidPhone_Apr07_AOffice Mobile was first introduced as Pocket Office in 1996, with only Word and Excel included in the suite. Pocket Office was then changed to Office Mobile with the release of the 5.0 version of the Windows Mobile OS. With this release, PowerPoint was included in the Office programs. When Office Mobile 2013 was released for Android devices, an Office 365 subscription was needed to use it. However, in somewhat of a surprise move, Microsoft has recently lifted this requirement making the home version of Office free to use on Android tablets and phones.

Free you say? Is it time to ditch Office 365?

Not so fast! If you are a business owner, it's not advisable to ditch your Office 365 subscription. This is because the Office app is free for home use, but if you have an Office 365 business account, you need to have a paid Office 365 Business subscription to edit and save documents.

The benefits of using Office on your Android

The Microsoft Office Mobile suite is a collection of mobile versions of the popular Microsoft Office. Since it’s now available for free, you may want to take advantage of what the programs have to offer.

One of the benefits of having Office on your device is that you can access or create files while on the go. Even if you’re not in front of your computer, you can still be productive as you work on important files anytime, anywhere. It is integrated with OneDrive so your files are synced, allowing you to continue working on your computer after working on your mobile device.

Office on your Android supports popular Word, Excel, and PowerPoint formats so you won't have problems opening and editing files. Office Mobile is also optimized for tablets and phones, making it convenient to use even on a small screen.

Office Mobile core applications

Office Mobile is a stripped down version of the Office Suite. Limited applications and features are available to make it work smoothly on mobile devices. Word Mobile, Excel Mobile and PowerPoint Mobile are the three programs that come with it.

Word Mobile

Word Mobile can be generally used like its desktop counterpart. While the desktop version supports more file formats, the mobile version is still be able to open a Word file that has an unsupported format without editing options. To enable editing, you must first save the file as a .DocX file which is supported by the mobile version.

Images, tables and lists can be added to a Word Mobile document. Other features that you can use include: find and replace, word count, and spell checker, though some fonts are not supported. For example, page breaks, footers, headers, endnotes, and footnotes cannot be used, though these will be kept if the original file contains them.

PowerPoint Mobile

PowerPoint Mobile was the last application to join the Office Mobile suite. On the Android version you can open, as well as edit presentations using PowerPoint, whether from the desktop or Web version. When it comes to authoring, it is only possible to edit text and add notes.

Excel Mobile

This application is compatible with its desktop counterpart. The Android version lets you open, save, edit, and create spreadsheets in '.xlsx' format. Files saved in '.xls' can also be viewed but not edited or saved. Using Excel Mobile, you can create graphs and charts, format cells and use formulas for simple calculations. Split panes and full screen mode are also supported.

Mobile Office is a fantastic addition to your Android apps, especially now that it comes for free for home users, and for business users with paid Office 365 subscriptions. You can now have the flexibility of accessing documents or working on important files anytime, using your mobile device.

If you have questions about Mobile Office connect with us and we will help you find productivity boosting solutions.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

March 14th, 2014

AndroidPhone_Mar10_AToday's smartphones offer users a lengthy list of features, from Internet connectivity to barometers or even GPS, they really are a highly mobile computer. That being said, many of us still use them primarily to communicate. These days, the preferred method of communication is the SMS or text. If you have a new Android phone there are numerous apps that offer text messaging and it can be difficult to locate your texts at first.

On the vast majority of Android devices there is more than one app that supports text messages. Here is an overview of the apps and how you can find text messages on your Android device.

The stock 'Messages' app

On almost all Android devices, especially those that use what's called an overlay (the device manufacturer's take on Android), there is the stock Messages app. When you first set up your phone, this is the app that will allow you to view and send messages by default.

Most devices already have a shortcut to this app on your device's home screen, usually in the drawer at the bottom of the screen. It usually looks like a speech bubble or an envelope with the words Messaging below it.

  1. Tapping on this app will open your text messages allowing you to read, send and reply to any messages. If you can't find this app, try:
  2. Clicking on the Apps icon on the bottom of your phone. It is usually represented by two rows of grey dots.
  3. Looking through the apps that come up. You are looking for an app with any of the icons listed above, or is called Messaging or SMS.
  4. Tapping on the app once you find it.
If you like, you can press on the app's icon for a second or two and then drag it to your device's Home Screen in order to place a shortcut there.

Google Hangouts

On new Google Nexus devices - especially the Nexus 5 - you probably won't find a messaging app. That is because Google has eliminated it, instead turning Google Hangouts into the new text messaging app.

Hangouts started as the instant messaging platform of Google+ and was then introduced as the new version of Google Chat, and finally the messaging platform on Google devices. In other words, Google Hangouts is the one app for instant messaging and texts across Google's platforms.

If you have the Hangouts app installed on your device, your text messages should show up when you open it. If you can't find your messages/would like to use Hangouts as your SMS app you can do so by:

  1. Opening Hangouts and signing in (if you need to) using your Google account.
  2. Pressing the three vertical squares at the top-right of the screen.
  3. Selecting Settings followed by SMS.
  4. Tapping on SMS Enabled followed by Default SMS app in the window that opens.
  5. Selecting Hangouts.
Your text messages should show up within a few seconds in the main hangouts messaging screen.

Which should I use?

This is a question some users have asked, as it can be slightly confusing as to which app they should be using. The true answer to the question is either! The stock apps, and Hangouts both offer full text messaging capabilities, it really comes down to which you prefer. Some apps present SMS messages in a clear and easy to read manner which some people prefer over Hangouts, while Hangouts is preferred by others, especially Google users.

If you are looking to learn more about the features of your Android phone, contact us today to see how we can help.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

January 17th, 2014

AndroidPhone_Jan13_AWhile it is often hard to believe, the smartphone is simply a computer that has been shrunk down into something we can hold in our hands. Anyone who has used a computer knows that these machines will eventually freeze or stop working - it's inevitable, and the same can be said for smartphones. There will come a time when your Android device freezes. The question is, do you know what to do when this happens?

If your Android phone or an app on the phone has frozen, here are two things you can try.

Frozen app? Try to force close it

Oftentimes when people say their phone has stopped working, the phone is running fine, it's an app that isn't working properly or which may have frozen completely. Because this does happen from time-to-time, Android has a built-in way you can force close apps when they stop working. This can be achieved by:
  1. Hitting the home button on your phone to go to the Home Screen (If you are in the app).
  2. Sliding down the notifications menu (slide from the top of your phone's screen) and tapping on the profile icon in the top-right.
  3. Tapping on Settings followed by Apps.
  4. Scrolling to the app that has stopped working and pressing on it.
  5. Pressing Force stop under the app's icon followed by OK.
These steps will close the app and usually keep it closed until you reopen the app again. However, some apps are essential and need to remain open in order for your phone to operate properly. If you are unsure of what an app does, don't force close it.

Did you try turning it off and on again?

There is a long-running gag on the tv show the IT Crowd where the techies in the basement answer every phone call by asking the caller if they have tried turning their computer off and on again.

While this may sound silly, and maybe even a little patronizing, restarting your device could be the solution it needs. In fact, many common errors are usually fixed by simply restarting your device. There are two types of restart you can execute:

  1. If you can still navigate your phone - Press and hold the power button for a second or two and the shutdown window should open. Tap on Power off and wait a few seconds. Your screen should go black and the device will be off. If you have low power, it may be a good idea to plug your phone in and charge it for a few minutes before starting your device up again. This type of shutdown/restart is the best because it allows your device to close all apps and stop all processes before it turns off.
  2. If your phone has frozen - This means you are not able to select apps and pushing the buttons does nothing. Android devices have different force restarts with most requiring you to hold the power button and volume down buttons for up to 10 seconds. Others require you to hold the power button and both of the volume buttons down. When the screen goes black, your device should switch off.
When a device has frozen, many people take the battery out - this should be an absolute last resort, as you could damage your device. If you can't remove the back cover of your device to get to the batter, don't try to remove it. Instead, try a forced restart. If this doesn't work, try plugging your device in and letting it charge for a few minutes before restarting it.

Should the device still not work, the best thing to do is to bring it to a mobile expert like us. We may be able to help you. And, if you are looking to learn more about your Android device, contact us today.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

December 20th, 2013

AndroidPhone_Dec17_AIf you have a newer Android phone, especially one running Android Jelly Bean (4.1-4.3) and KitKat 4.4, you have access to Google Now. This app is meant to be like an assistant that is linked to Google Search. With Google Now you can search for information and it will display info that it thinks is important to you e.g., traffic on your route home and the weather. One of the more powerful features is that you can interact with the app by simply speaking.

How to use Google Now

With most phones, you can access Google Now by pressing and holding the home button on your device. You should see a circle appear on the screen that says Google. Swipe up to it and let go to open the app. If that doesn't work, open the app drawer on your device and look for the Google app (blue square with a lowercase g). Owners of the Nexus 5, should be able to say, "Ok, Google", from anywhere on the main screen or swipe to the left from the home screen to open Google Now.

Once you are taken to the main Google Now screen you will see useful cards that the app deems relevant to you e.g., weather, traffic, time to home, sport scores, upcoming calendar of events, information related to your most recent Google search, upcoming flight information and more.

To start a search, or interact with Google Now, simply say: "Ok, Google." If that doesn't work, tap the microphone in the search bar at the top so that you can use voice commands.

General commands

These commands are search related and you can use them to find information on Google Search. You can start a search by saying "Search for (something)," If you ask Google Now to "Search for the nearest computer repair shop," for example, you should get the same results you would using Google Search on your browser.

You can also start a search by asking a question. Ask, for example, "How many gallons is 5 liters?" and you should see the conversion pop right up.

If you come across a word and are unsure what it means, ask the app to, "Define (word)", or ask, "What does (word) mean?" You should see the definition displayed, along with additional information.

Setting notes and reminders

You can also use Google Now to set reminders and notes by saying:
  • Wake me up at (time e.g., 5 am tomorrow) - This will take you to your phone's alarm screen and automatically set your alarm.
  • Remind me to (action) on/at (time) e.g., (remind me to order pizza at 11:00 am) - This will set a reminder on your phone and let you know at 11:00 am to order pizza. You can even ask to set location specific reminders e.g., "Remind me when I get to work to email Jane."

Communication

There are a number of useful commands you can use to interact with the communication features of your phone.
  • Call (person) - Be sure to say the name of the contact as they are on your phone. If you have more than one contact with the same, or similar name, the app will ask you which one you want to call.
  • Send email to (person) subject (your subject) body (your message) - This will create an email message directly in Google Now. If the email is correct, you can press the send icon, all without having to open your email app.
  • Send SMS to (contact) (message) - Will draft a text message directly in Google Now. If the app is unsure of the contact, you will be asked to pick from a list. If the message is correct, you will be able to send it directly from the app.
There are actually over 60 useful voice commands you can use with Google Now. Check out this infographic to see all of them. If you would like to learn more about using Android in your business, please contact us today.
Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

November 22nd, 2013

AndroidPhone_Nov18_AOctober 31 is traditionally a night of halloweening. Kids dress up and run around the neighborhoods gathering as much candy as they can find. This year however, Google decided they would unwrap a special treat for adults too, one many Android fans have been waiting for: Android 4.4 - KitKat and the Google Nexus 5. As with any release of a new phone and operating system, businesses may be wondering if these devices are going to be useful in the office.

Below is a brief overview of the new Nexus 5 and Android 4.4 and what they mean for businesses.

Nexus 5 - Possibly 2013's worst kept secret News of this latest phone was rumored and even leaked months before Google announced it. Everyone who is a tech follower knew all about it already. So, when Google finally announced its introduction no one was really that surprised.

It is now expected that Google will announce a new Nexus phone each year. This is the device that Google deems to be the new benchmark for all future Android devices. With a stock version of Android, this is also the closest you will get to a 'pure Google' experience, not to mention the fact that these devices are usually quite powerful.

The Nexus 5, built by LG, is the benchmark device for late 2013/2014 and will be the among the first devices to get new versions of Android when these come out later next year.

If you are looking at this device for business purposes, here are six specifications that you might want to focus on and consider:

  • Size and display - This device has a 4.95 inch screen (from top-left to bottom-right corners) and is a little over five inches long. The display itself is 1920x1080 pixels, and many reviewers are calling it the best display on a smartphone to date. Like most other high-end smartphones, you likely won't struggle reading font on this device even when zoomed in.
  • Processor - The Nexus 5 has a processor that is more powerful than many of today's lower to mid-range laptops. Clocking in at 2.26GHz, it can handle everything you do on a smartphone without any issues.
  • Storage and memory - There are two versions of the Nexus 5. One with 16GB and the other with 32GB of storage. Both versions should be more than enough storage space for all business users. The device also has 2GB of RAM which ensures that you will be more than able to run multiple programs at the same time.
  • Connectivity - As with most new phones, you will be able to connect to 4G/LTE data networks (if they are available in your area). If you don't have 4G/LTE, this phone can also connect to 3G and Wi-Fi networks. This means you will be able to easily stay in contact with the office, usually with high-speed connections.
  • Battery - LG has put a bigger battery in the Nexus 5, thus many users are seeing the phone lasting a full day, or more, on one charge. This is great news for business users away from the office or a charger for long periods of time.
  • Price and availability - The Nexus 5 is available in the US, Australia and the UK now from the Google Play store, and is also available from many carriers and electronic stores around the world. Possibly the biggest draw for this phone is the price - the 16GB costs USD $349 while the 32GB costs $399 on the Google Play store and comes unlocked.
This makes the device affordable for many users, including small businesses - especially if purchased on contract.

Break us off a piece of that KitKat The Nexus 5 is the first device to be launched with the newest version of Android - Android 4.4 KitKat. As with the last few versions of Android, the 4.4 version is an incremental update instead of a completely new operating system. There are a number of new updates introduced in 4.4 worthy of note that business users will benefit from.

  • SMS rolled into Hangouts - Google has decided to roll their SMS app into their chat app Hangouts. In fact, on any phones with Hangout installed, and updated to the latest version, you should be able to view and send SMS messages. With the Nexus 5, Hangouts is the SMS app.
  • Increased Google Now presence - Google Now, Google's voice-powered assistant has been beefed up, and can now be accessed by swiping left from the home screen. You can also activate Google Search, programs and give basic commands like calling or messaging people from the home screen by simply saying, "Ok, Google". If you don't want to speak, you can enter your search from the now omnipresent Search bar at the top of the screen.
  • New version of QuickOffice - QuickOffice comes installed on nearly all Android devices and is the app used to open documents and PDFs that are downloaded to your phone. The new version allows users to open, edit and create Microsoft Word, PowerPoint and Excel documents. It is also integrated with Google Drive, allowing you to store files on Drive, or even other cloud services.
  • Support for more devices - Google has noted that Android 4.4 was designed to work on a wider number of devices, especially those with lower hardware specifications. This should help push 4.4 to more devices.
As is usual for Android, newer Google Nexus devices will get the update soon, probably by the end of November. Older devices, like the Google Nexus from 2011, will not be getting the update, and devices made by other companies will have to wait to see what the manufacturer does. If you have a relatively new device, chances are good you will receive an update, it just may take a while.

Is the Nexus 5 good for businesses? If you are in the market for a new smartphone that can do anything and everything, then the Nexus 5 is likely the best phone currently available, especially considering the price is much lower than similar unlocked phones.

Of course, if you are still on contract with an existing phone and are looking to upgrade you should contact your mobile provider to see if the phone is available and that you can upgrade to it.

Before you do rush out and purchase the Nexus 5 however, you should make sure that your existing systems will integrate well with it. Why not contact us, as we can help ensure that any new phone will work with the systems you already have in place, or may be able to provide a solution for you.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.